Features

contains feature posts

Shivjeet Bharti

Chandigarh:  This is a kind of a success story which everyone dreams of, but there are a few like 26-year-old Shivjeet Bharti, who can make dreams come true against all odds.

One of the 48 students to clear the Haryana Civil Services (Executive) examination (HCS), Bharti is one among the many who come from a humble background.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

When price hikes and domestic issues shook the country,  2019 was a year that held positive signals for the book publishing industry.

Figures indicate that the young generation have turned their eyes from cyber world to book pages.   In addition to printed book sales registering an ascent,  e-books and voice tapes of books also made considerable gains.  However, the segment among books that claimed the major share of the growth was not creative works,  but other categories.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

London: Parents, take a note. Researchers have found that encouraging children to repeat words to themselves, that emphasise effort over ability could bring greater success.

The study, published in the journal Child Development, found that children who engaged in self-talk improved their math performance when the talk focused on effort, not ability.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Representational image only

New York: Researchers have found that smaller class sizes are not always associated with better pupil performance and achievement.

"This finding is perhaps due to the fact that class size effects are more likely to be detected in countries with limited school resources where teacher quality is lower on average," said study researcher Spyros Konstantopoulos from Michigan State University in the US.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

It is not accidental that most of the laws rushed through and passed in parliament by the six-month old Modi government with its brute majority, are related to 'national security'.  In the post-truth era,  the sensitively hot political phrase with the biggest turnover is 'naional security'.   Therefore, the very act of raising a criticism against the government's actions aimed at national security will constitute a serious crime. 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

It may appear only coincidental that on a day when the country was observing the 70th anniversary  of the Constituent Assembly's adoption of India's Constitution,  the Supreme Court issued a verdict that held aloft the core spirit of the constitution.   Whether the two events were accidental or otherwise to happen on the same day,  in current circumstances it needs to be highlighted that the SC order was a moment of pride and relief.  Recent events have been moving in such a manner as to prompt an observation that ever since the ultra-Hindutva g

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Representational image

In his Independence Day speech on August 15 this year, Prime Minister Narendra Modi proclaimed, "One nation, one constitution -- this spirit has become a reality and India is proud of it."

Prime Minister Modi is correct when he says that "one nation, one constitution" should be the goal for the Indian democracy. He may not be so correct, however, when he states "this spirit has become a reality."

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Gender stereotypes leaves imprint on human brains PTI21 April 2019 5:50 PM

 

Washington: Society's expectations about gender roles alter the human brain at the cellular level, scientists say.

Though the terms 'sex' and 'gender' are often used interchangeably by the average person, for neuroscientists, they mean different things, according to Nancy Forger, a professor at Georgia State University in the US.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Shauqat Ali

I met Shauqat Ali at Guwahati Medical College Hospital which is under the surveillance of Assam police and para-military forces.

"They could have lynched me to death before making me eat pork," lamented Shauqat the moment I took his hand in mine.  His swollen cheeks have marks of nails.  With a towel, he wiped the eyes which were still red bearing the marks of a treatment with chili powder still giving him burning sensation.  Shauqat's son took the towel and wiped the tears off his father's cheeks.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Representational image

Washington: Young children whose parents read them five books a day enter kindergarten having heard about 1.4 million more words than children who were never read to, a study has found.

This “million word gap” could be one key in explaining differences in vocabulary and reading development, said Jessica Logan, assistant professor at The Ohio State University in the U.S.

Even children who are read only one book a day will hear about 2,90,000 more words by age 5 than those who don’t regularly read books with a parent or caregiver.

RECOMMENDED STORIES