Begin typing your search above and press return to search.
exit_to_app
Fantasies of Mayawati
access_time 2021-09-16T20:37:12+05:30
Hathras: Cant that family be spared yet?
access_time 2021-09-17T11:57:21+05:30
Pitiable, if not shameful
access_time 2021-09-15T10:00:47+05:30
JNU: Death of a public university
access_time 2021-09-15T11:59:12+05:30
Scapegoats to hide failings
access_time 2021-09-14T18:57:17+05:30
DEEP READ
exit_to_app
Homechevron_rightTechnologychevron_rightStudy unlocks...

Study unlocks mysteries about Alzheimer's

text_fields
bookmark_border
Study unlocks mysteries about Alzheimers
cancel

Washington: Scientists have shed light on the three essential puzzles regarding Alzheimer's, a science journal reported.

Using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with Alzheimer's disease, Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have clarified three fundamental issues about Alzheimer's: where it starts, why it starts there, and how it spreads.

The findings could improve early detection of the disease, when drugs may be most effective. The study was published in the online edition of the journal Nature Neuroscience, reports Science Daily.

"It has been known for years that Alzheimer's starts in a brain region known as the entorhinal cortex," said senior co-author Scott A. Small, director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center.

"But this study is the first to show in living patients that it begins specifically in the lateral entorhinal cortex, or LEC," he said.

"The LEC is considered to be a gateway to the hippocampus, which plays a key role in the consolidation of long-term memory, among other functions. If the LEC is affected, other aspects of the hippocampus will also be affected," Small added.

The study also shows that, over the time, Alzheimer's spreads from the LEC directly to other areas of the cerebral cortex, in particular the parietal cortex, a brain region involved in various functions, including spatial orientation and navigation.

IANS

Show Full Article
TAGS:
Next Story