Begin typing your search above and press return to search.
exit_to_app
Russia invades Ukraine; unusual military action
access_time 2022-02-24T15:55:36+05:30
access_time 2022-05-27T09:44:32+05:30
Who is afraid of caste census?
access_time 2022-05-26T12:51:32+05:30
Kashmiri Pandits being let down again
access_time 2022-05-24T09:53:10+05:30
Its time to restore the rule of law
access_time 2022-05-23T12:17:31+05:30
exit_to_app
Homechevron_rightWorldchevron_rightIran President...

Iran President Ahmadinejad begins historic Egypt visit

text_fields
bookmark_border
Iran President Ahmadinejad begins historic Egypt visit
cancel

Cairo: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has become the first Iranian president to visit Egypt since the Islamic revolution in 1979.

He was greeted on arrival at Cairo International Airport by his Egyptian counterpart, Mohammed Morsi, reported BBC.

Ahmadinejad is to attend a summit of the Organisation of Islamic Co-operation (OIC), which begins on Wednesday, and meet Egyptian officials.

Relations between the regional powers have improved since Egyptians elected an Islamist head of state in June.

However, they remain at odds over several issues, including Syria, which was suspended from the OIC at its last summit despite Iranian objections.

"I will try to pave the ground for developing co-operation between Iran and Egypt," Ahmadinejad was quoted as saying by Iran's state news agency, Irna, before leaving Tehran.

"If Tehran and Cairo see more eye-to-eye on regional and international issues, many [issues] will change," he added.

Diplomatic ties broke down in 1980 after Egypt signed a peace treaty with Israel and gave asylum and a state funeral to Iran's exiled Shah Reza Pahlavi. In 1981, Iran named a street in Tehran after the assassin of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, though it was renamed 20 years later.

Ahmadinejad's visit follows one to Tehran by Morsi in August, when the two leaders agreed to reopen embassies.

As the most populous Arab country and a historic regional heavyweight, in the past, Egypt, a predominantly Sunni Muslim power, has seen itself as a political rival of Shia Iran, says the BBC's Yolande Knell in Cairo.

Some analysts have expressed concern over the apparent decision of the new Islamist leader to reconnect with Iran, our correspondent adds.

They note that Tehran hailed Egypt's uprising two years ago, which forced President Hosni Mubarak to resign, as an "Islamic awakening".

President Morsi is hosting the OIC summit following days of nationwide protests by opposition supporters in which nearly 60 people have died.

IANS

Show Full Article
TAGS:
Next Story