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Homechevron_rightOpinionchevron_rightHow it's like being an ...

How it's like being an Army wife!

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How its like being an Army wife!
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Much has been written about the sacrifices and hardships of our soldiers. Beginning from the young age, the life in the army uniform gives most of them no family life. Their memories of the life partner, kids and parents end with the occasional home-town visits - not everyone though.

In a post on the 'Humans of Bombay' Facebook page, a Mumbai lawyer has shared the tough realities of being an army wife. Since being shared on September 29, the post has received more than 10,300 shares.

In the post, the woman talks about how she met the love of her life at the National Defence Academy in Pune. She was a student at Symbiosis but would take the bus to NDA every weekend to eat at the canteen. They became friends, stayed in touch by writing each other letters and decided to spend their lives together.

"6 years went by like this, and finally after that he sent me an SMS saying - 'I really feel for you and I would like to be with you'- and at that point it all just fit. There was no over the top proposal, or exorbitant gesture...but there was love and stability," she says on Facebook.

She moved to Bhatinda, where her husband was posted and worked as a lawyer out of her home. Soon, the couple realized that if she were to have a career of her own, she couldn't move around the country with him to different postings. So they decided that she should live and work in Mumbai.

"It's tough, it's really tough but it puts so many other things in perspective. For one - our long letters have become long whatsapp conversations!" she says.

Today, they have a three-year-old daughter and the family gets to be together only once every four months for about 15 days. "There are days when I miss him so much and my daughter will console me and tell me it's for our country," she says.

She speaks about "an army man's passion towards his country. Her words, especially what she says about how we need to celebrate our Jawaans' every day and not just when they sacrifice their lives for the country, will bring a lump to your throat.

Read her entire post below:

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