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Homechevron_rightWorldchevron_rightKangaroos cause more...

'Kangaroos cause more road accidents in Australia'

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Kangaroos cause more road accidents in Australia
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Canberra: Australia's most iconic native animal, the kangaroo, causes more road accidents in the nation than all other animals combined, according to a new data.

Statistics released by one of Australia's leading general insurance providers -- AAMI -- revealed that kangaroos are responsible for nine out of 10 road accidents involving animals, Xinhua news agency reported.

AAMI analysed almost 20,000 reported road claims made in 2015 and found that kangaroos accounted for 88 per cent of the accidents, while wallabies (6 per cent), wombats (3 per cent) and dogs (2 per cent) made up the most common animal collisions in Australia.

Kangaroos are large marsupials that are found only in Australia. They are well known for their ability to jump and carry their babies, called joeys, in their pouch. Estimates of Australia's kangaroo population vary between 30 and 60 million. They can be spotted in the wild in most rural parts of Australia.

AAMI spokesman, Michael Mills, said collisions between vehicles and animals on Australian roads jumped by 68 per cent in winter, peaking in the period of June and August, with a major spike in July.

"Shorter days during winter mean we're on the roads more at times when animals are on the move, and combined with poor weather conditions and reduced visibility, make the chances of hitting an animal more likely," Mills said on Tuesday.

"Colliding with an animal is a frightening and traumatic experience, especially if the animal is injured or killed, and can result in serious damage or injury."

Mills said accidents could pose a serious danger to both the drivers and the animals.

AAMI's analysis pinpointed the worst spots in the nation for animal-related collisions, with Queanbeyan in New South Wales (NSW) being named the road-kill capital of Australia.

The Victorian city of Bendigo, the Queensland town of Dingo and the NSW town of Singleton and city of Goulburn rounded out the worst five hotspots for animal accidents in the country.

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