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Homechevron_rightWorldchevron_rightJapan specs ban for...

Japan 'specs ban' for women at work sparks backlash

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Japan specs ban for women at work sparks backlash
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Tokyo: Some Japanese companies deciding to ban women from wearing spectacles to work has led to widespread condemnation and sparked heated discussions on social media, the media reported on Friday.

According to Japanese media reports, the companies have "banned" eyewear for female employees for various reasons, the BBC reported.

Among them, some retail chains reportedly said glasses-wearing shop assistants gave a "cold impression".

It was not clear whether the "ban" was based on company policies, or rather reflected what was socially accepted practice in those workplaces.

But the topic has led to heated debates on social media.

The hashtag #glassesareforbidden has been popular in Japan and the topic continued to attract tweets on Friday.

A similar workplace controversy in Japan over high heels had also received flak on the social media.

Actor and writer Yumi Ishikawa launched a petition calling for Japan to end dress codes after being made to wear high heels while working at a funeral parlour.

The movement attracted a stream of support and a strong social media following.

Supporters tweeted the petition alongside the hashtag #KuToo in solidarity with her cause, mirroring the #MeToo movement against sexual abuse.

The slogan plays on the Japanese words for shoes "kutsu" and pain "kutsuu".

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