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Moon to wait for NASA man till 2025 due to insufficient funds

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Moon to wait for NASA man till 2025 due to insufficient funds
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New York: The NASA administrator, Bill Nelson announced that the space agency has decided to delay the moon landing mission until 2025. The Trump administration had set the deadline for 2024.

Nasa's last moon landing mission was in 1972 in which 12 men explored the lunar surface.

Nasa is aiming to conduct the first test flight in February 2022 with no one on board. In 2024, astronauts are planning to strap in for the second Artemis flight and fly beyond the moon but not land.

Nelson said that Congress had not provided enough money to develop a landing system for the Artemis moon programme and more fun is required for Orion capsules. Technology for new spacesuits are also in need of updating before astronauts could return to the moon, reported The Guardian.

He told the media that the human landing system is a crucial part as it will be getting the first woman and first person of colour to the lunar surface. He added that Nasa is committed to helping restore America's standing in the world.

Nelson stated that Congress will have to increase funding with the 2023 budget for Nasa to have private companies competing for the planned 10 or more moon landings by astronauts. Development costs for the rocket through the first Artemis flight next year stand at $11bn. Nasa has requested a bigger budget for Orion capsules, from $6.7bn to $9.3bn.

Nasa had originally planned the lunar landing in 2028. The former vice-president of the US, Mike Pence in 2019 called for the mission's completion within five years "by any means necessary." Pushing the deadline to 2024 was considered "exceedingly ambitious" at the time.

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