Top
Begin typing your search above and press return to search.
exit_to_app
exit_to_app
Homechevron_rightSportschevron_rightCricketchevron_rightRacism incident during ...

Racism incident during Sydney Test: Double-standard in condemnations highlighted

text_fields
bookmark_border
Racism incident during Sydney Test: Double-standard in condemnations highlighted
cancel
camera_alt

Australia's Mitchell Starc, India's captain Ajinkya Rahane, Australia's David Warner and India's Mohammed Siraj greet each other at the end of the third cricket Test match between Australia and India at the Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG) in Sydney on January 11, 2021.

New Delhi: After condemnations and disapproval remarks poured in after incidents of racism reported during the third Test match between Australia and India at the Sydney Cricket Ground, many have come forward highlighting the double-standard in responses to similar incidents.

Racism incident during the sports events is not new. Several times, even players themselves were at the perpetrator's side.

However, responses towards the incidents apparently varied in their magnitude.

In 2008, during a Test match at SCG, the Australians claimed that Indian off spinner Harbhajan Singh had called Australian all-rounder Andre Symmonds a 'monkey.' The Aussies felt it was racial as Symmonds belonged to a different ethnic origin.

Though Harbhajan was banned for 3 matches, the off-spinner played the following matches as the ban was called off due to BCCI's protest.

In June 2020, former West Indies captain Darren Sammy complained that he was often called racist names during his stint with Sunrisers Hyderabad in the Indian Premier League.

"I just learnt what that 'kalu' meant when I played for Sunrisers in the IPL. They call me and Perera by that name. I thought it meant strong Stallion. My previous post tells me something different and I'm angry," Sammy had wrote on his Instagram page.

Later in a tweet, he had called upon the International Cricket Council for action against racist remarks against people like him.

Many has come forward highlighting the disparity in the magnitude of response after the racist remarks against Indian players at SCG was reported.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has strongly condemned the incidents during the SCG match, that ended on Monday.

In a statement, ICC said that it has also offered Cricket Australia all necessary support in investigating the incidents.

The Indian team had apprised match referee David Boon of alleged racial abuse at the end of the third day's play. Match and stadium officials were alert on the fourth day and as such play was halted and six people were evicted following another incident just before Tea during Australia's second innings.

"There is no place for discrimination in our sport and we are incredibly disappointed that a small minority of fans may think that this abhorrent behaviour is acceptable. We have a comprehensive anti-discrimination policy in place that members have to abide by and ensure is adhered to by fans and we welcome the action taken by ground authorities and Cricket Australia today," said ICC Chief Executive Manu Sawhney.

"We will provide Cricket Australia and the relevant authorities with our full support in any ensuing investigation as we will not tolerate any racism in our sport."

Under the ICC anti-discrimination policy, the Australian cricket board will now be required to investigate the issue and provide a report to the ICC on the incident and any action taken to ensure the issue has been dealt with appropriately.

Cricket Australia, on its part, has already confirmed that it has launched an investigation into the incident that took place on Day Four of the Pink Test.

Sunday's incident followed alleged racial abuse of Indian players - Jasprit Bumrah and Mohammed Siraj - by a section of the SCG crowd, the complaint of which was officially made by the Indian team on Saturday.

Show Full Article
TAGS:
Next Story